i know i fall into this trap: i think a lot about an idea and don’t do anything about it. if you have the time, the best thing you can do with an idea is put it to use. for example, i wanted to see what it was like to sell products on a retail platform called gumroad. i thought about it for months, until finally this past week i tried it out and learned 10x more than i would have from just reading about the site.

startup-lingo and innovators call the testing your ideas “prototyping”. you build a simple, shitty version of the think you’d like to try and see if it works. making a paper boat is prototyping for building a bigger, more complicated boat. the question with prototypes is often “will this work?”. and, more often than not, we discover that we have a lot more questions than when we initially started.

if you are interested in new and emerging technologies, prototyping is indispensable. theory must be paired with practice. all the things you learn in school should ideally be applied in the real world to see how they work. true learning, in my opinion, is hands on in this sense. if you build a small prototype of your business, your product, or artistic idea, you are positioned to continue to learn one thousand times more than the folks who just sit around and muse.