toolbox / sandbox

right now i am using glitch, a website that allows its users to try out and edit small programming projects. i’ve been learning javascript and a little bit of vr. i’m a little embarrassed by it, but i made a small mother’s day card for my mom which you can see below.

my strategy has been to just spend time playing with the tools on glitch in order to see what is possible and what i like. i have limited resources (i’m working primarily from a chromebook and an iphone) so glitch works out really well for me because it is based online. i’ve been having a good time trying things out, even though i don’t have a clear idea of where it will lead me.

toys and patience

i had a good weekend! interviewed seattle toymakers marnin-saylor, which will be up on youtube and podcast soon. what struck me about them is that they are immensely creative – they are never short on ideas for products or stories for their pastry pet toy line. their struggles mainly surround time management. it’s hard to be a manufacturer, a salesperson, and an administrator all at once. however, outsourcing is also scary to them. it’s hard to get the initial capital to expand, and you also run the risk of losing creative control.

in response, marnin-saylor are waiting for the right moment for growth. they care about their business so much, and as a result they have something that i don’t: patience. taking a leaf from their book, i am trying to enjoy my successes for the time being and to quietly be on the look out for the right conditions to next-level my own projects

discouraged? me too

every project has its setbacks. the path is never linear, and success is not clearly defined nor easily achievable. last night i stayed up awake for a bit because i was unsure of what i was doing, or whether or not it was valuable. this is a hard place to be, and i know for a fact that this happens to a majority of my more entrepreneurial friends.

but, i remember that there is hope. for every doubt that i have, there is at least one cheerleader in my court, and one clear example that what i am doing is valuable and meaningful. i try to identify these little victories and bits of positivity in order to maximize them. my friends and family believe in what i do, and so do i. the trouble is marrying these values with a viable business. i recently read this article by gumroad’s ceo sahil lavingia, in which he navigates his own successes and failures that he had to face at a very young age.

we are all being courageous in trying things that we’ve never tried before. and that courage carries us through the moments when we doubt ourselves and our venture. our courage and resilience are paramount in soldiering forward with open eyes and many ideas for making our vision work.

chey is encouraging me to vlog

chey, a vlogger, has shown me so many incredible videos of people being themselves on youtube. it has been so inspiring that i thought “man, i should do that!”

“you should!!” chey tells me. but i am a bit camera shy and not used to the whole idea of filming myself. part of the reason i do interviews is because i don’t have to do much. all of the attention and focus is on the interview subject rather than myself. with vlogging, the dynamic is totally different.

i’ve been practicing, though. i am trying to figure out my formula and form, so there are a handful of unlisted videos up on youtube that i’ll be adding to as i (big eye roll) find my voice. but i am excited to publish them eventually once i get over this initial self-conscious bashfulness.

a time for me

“fridays were the days i would set aside for me,” says cordero core in our most recent interview on the orbit. cordero set aside specific times when he wouldn’t do his assigned work, and instead focus on things that interested him. now at 31, he has a ton of stories, skills, and hobbies along with his engineering degree.

i am taking a leaf out of his book today and trying to spend time doing focused play. my peers are so good at working hard and not very good at resting or enjoying themselves, so in a sense i think doing the things you love is a bit rebellious and revolutionary, and will take you to places you may have never found otherwise.

twitch hypothesis

i recently started streaming on twitch. this is a messy platform that reminds me of myspace, since it has a lot of room for interactive customization. in reading about twitch, i learned that there is a quieter side to the platform that is not entirely focused on gaming. some folks knit. others read. some draw. me? i’m seeing if i can collaboratively write a tv script via livestream.

it’s an experiment, and i don’t know how it’s going to pan out. i know i need my schedule to be consistent, and i know i have to work out some logistical problems with sharing what’s on my screen, but i love working on platforms that are still growing and figuring out what they are. because in a sense, so am i.

the alligator wrestler

i spoke with coredero core on our podcast the orbit. cordero has tried a little bit of everything, from mma fighting to baking to chemical engineering. because he had such a diverse set of hobbies, i asked him how he got into so may different side projects.

“well, i once heard that when an employer looks through a stack of resumes, everyone more or less does the same thing. they look the same on paper, and when that’s the case you really have to distinguish yourself from the pack. having a hobby helps – everyone wants to know an alligator wrestler.”

he used this as an example (he doesn’t actually wrestle alligators), but it made sense. the thing that makes you shine are your interests beyond work. having hobbies shows that you love to learn and are self motivated and creative. what are the things that would distinguish you from one hundred other applicants?