websites – who really needs them?

i have a vendetta against the personal website. i have one (it’s not this one) and i’m ready to get rid of it. i am told, for a business, you need to have a website. my question: do you really?

like, i understand for websites that sell products. you want to go to the site to investigate the brand, the products, and possibly purchase. but for many other folks, you visit the website once and never again. the page i go to the most is the company’s “about” page and then maybe their “pricing”. i rarely read their blogs or any of the body content on the site. maybe i’m alone in this, but i have a hunch i’m not.

considering my squarespace costs $18/mo and it does very little in terms of connecting me with an audience, i am planning to retire it. if anything, i am paying $18/mo for faux credibility. “oh he has a website, he must be legit” says the imaginary voice in my head. this is indeed a fantasy. you don’t need a website to be legit. you do, however, need an internet presence. and this can be done FOR FREE on facebook and instagram. you can even have a low cost blog (like this one) which yields much more engagement than a static site that serves as a $18/mo business card.

maybe one day i’ll hit the scale that i can afford a website. but as i am experimenting and trying to find out my niche, my customer base, and my services, i am not going to pay a recurring fee for a billboard that does nothing for me.

cool directory

to continue on yesterday’s post on focused play, i also have made it a point to just dig deep into my google docs. what’s funny is that when i am bored i will just poke around in my folders, organizing the files until i suddenly come up with an idea that excites me. and, i realized recently that you can create tiny websites for free with a tool called google sites. i made a small “cool directory” that you can see here.

this small website was a solution to my project problem: i have so many projects that i’ve completed and/or am working on, i realized i needed a google sheet to keep track of them all. the website serves as a more palatable way to navigate the most recent videos and streams i’ve published.

this and yesterday’s mother’s day card are both small, but i think it is important to show off the little things along with the big projects, just because it validates what you’re doing, and provides some momentum for doing more. i hope that by learning one hundred little things, it will make building the big thing that much easier.

instagram matters

instagram is a little portfolio. it could be of your life, your art, your shop, your products, or your perspective. but the truth of the matter is that it can do almost everything a website does but better. i am not suggesting that you game the platform, but maybe figure out the best way to use it.

as with any creative endeavor, find the people who do it well and identify what makes their profiles work. i am a huge fan of the way aoc uses instagram, so i tried to think about what was good about it. her posts feel authentic, not over-polished, and full of useful information that relates to her mission. thus, i try to shape my presence in a similar way.

i recently did a bit of consulting work for a cafe. “why do i need instagram?” the owner asked me. i told him the truth: when a customer considers coming to your cafe, instagram will likely be the first or second thing they check when they decide whether or not they’ll stop in for the first time. and, being near a train station, this is especially true for out of towners.

for you, how can you make a first impression on instagram to show your audience what you’re all about? who does instagram well, and how can you take parts of what they do and make them yours?